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and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force. and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-america japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in light of history it was an error. and so today, this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this poi
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
, they may have done it there or may have had a region, a quantum leap there, as jim was talking about, where will you develop those bomb-making skills? you don't go to m.i.t. to learn,build pressure cooker bombs, do you go to the caucuses, do you go to that area of the world where these devices have been used successfully to attack humanity for year upon year upon year. so i think that six-month period, the russians help us in that we may be able to identify who he was working with and gone to perhaps some type of terroristic training, bomb making school. realize the two brothers set some place. they built multiple pressure cooker bombs, built these hand-held devices. they did a lot. we have had fwhoermts u.s. try to blow their underwear up, try to blow their shoes up, try to blow their car up and they weren't successful, thank god. >> you think this goes beyond what they could pick up on the internet? >> i do i do. i think somebody sitting over their shoulder neath needed to be done. i don't think it was looking a this the seven or eight-page manual you could pull out of inspiration the al
at the beginning of the iraq war map. jim asked me does this still hold true today? to movie stars need to be afraid to speak out and i would say yes. the lesson is if you care about your pocketbook come if you want to speak and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong you'll never get in trouble but if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you believe as a citizen we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everyone from the beginning white, male. since then we've expanded. i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who is sovereign, the american people declared it rather than a king or queen. you couldn't of a king or queen taking your land away because they had given it to use your sovereign rights of everyone has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government we should expect that and yet at the beginning of the iraq war map when they spoke out against the war they had their invitation to talk to the baseball hall of fame and right after that i had a crew from fox news come to my hous
on this particular issue to comment on this and on her question of the political will. >> thank you very much, jim. if i knew the answer on political will, i suppose there would be more prophetic qualities to my history. one hopes that we will see it, one hopes that we will see immigration and gun control and other efforts. i spent my life as a diplomat and spent a good part of that life trying to importune other governments to live up to the rule of law. i was cha gripped, embarrassed -- chagrined, embarrassed and, indeed, in many ways felt undermined by the notion that our country which instructed me on numerous occasions to uphold the rule of law particularly indefinite detention without trial was something that we now practice and continue to practice despite all of the questions that people tend to want to raise about a war and prisoners of war and all of the rest. my sense is that we need a specific way forward. the report contains recommendations on a specific way forward; simply trial or military commission with rights and privileges equal to our article iii court or system. if that won't
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7